How to Write a Letter of Recommendation For a Scholarship

how to write a letter of recommendation for a scholarship

When it comes to writing a Scholarship Recommendation Letter, one thing you should have at the back of your mind is that while they are usually written by a teacher or other adult mentor, the writer should be able to give a good overall picture of the candidate who is applying for the scholarship as well as his or her character as a person. 

The very essence of providing a letter of recommendation when applying for a scholarship is for the scholarship committee to be sure about your qualifications for a specific scholarship. It is added proof that makes you worthy and deserving of such an award. 

In other words, anyone who is going to handle the recommendation letter for a scholarship must be someone who can tell you much about you in terms of thumbs-up. 

Depending on the school or organization offering the scholarship, the letter of recommendation usually comes with different requirements. So if you are in the position to write a letter recommendation for a scholarship, you want to make sure that you have gone through the application fully to see if they want you to make sure specific things are covered. 

Your teachers are also in the best position to write a letter of recommendation for you for the scholarship. So you should not feel skeptical about asking them to do so. 

A letter of recommendation for a scholarship is a very unique piece that must be written with caution. This post will take you through all you need to know how to write a killer letter of recommendation for a scholarship. 

Writing a scholarship recommendation letter: what is required? 

Certain things determine and show a perfectly written recommendation letter. Most students trust other people in handling their recommendation letters, for example, your teacher or religious leader. But this is the most tricky aspect because you need to be sure about something. 

The first thing is that you want to be sure that you are asking the best person in a position to write the letter. Also, you need to consider the deadline for receiving the recommendation letter from them. Is it too short for them to complete at their convenience? Because you don’t expect something written under rush to be perfect. 

You also want to make sure that the person you are asking to write your scholarship recommendation letter has enough information about you and the school you are applying for. 

If you think all these are bothersome for the person, then you may want to consider writing your recommendation letter yourself and asking them to simply append their signature at the end of the letter. But based on experience, I’ll tell you that this is not advisable in all cases. 

While it matters who writes your scholarship recommendation letter, it is also important that such a person is aware of how the letter should be written. Below are the necessary points that should be included when writing a perfect scholarship recommendation letter. 

  1. Formal Letterhead E.g teachers can put their school’s letterhead here. 
  2. Formal address to the reader 
  3. A brief restatement of the scholarship requirements
  4. Explain Why the candidate you  recommend fits those scholarship requirements
  5. Outline the  candidate’s grades or accomplishments
  6. A few positive points of interest for the scholarship committee
  7. Append your Your signature

It is important to keep a recommendation letter short and simple because that is what works. The above points are what can be found in any successfully written recommendation letter for scholarship. Remember, it is the recommendation letter that causes the committee to take a good look at the candidate.

 

So how do you properly write a recommendation letter for a scholarship? 

 

When writing a recommendation letter for a scholarship, your priority is to write only positive things about the student in question. In the same regard, if you have nothing to say about the student, then maybe you are not the right person to write the letter. 

As a writer, you should include absolute genuineness and uniqueness. The last thing you want to include in the letter is the discipline problems of your students or candidate in question as it can pass negative impressions about the student to the scholarship committee. 

When writing a recommendation letter for a scholarship, do not include private information about the student. The aim is to share the positive remarks of the student such as good conduct and achievements that are relevant to the scholarship requirements. 

You should not include sensitive and personal matters of the student as it is regarded as oversharing. 

Especially a letter coming from a teacher as one who is writing the recommendation letter, the scholarship committee will not find it impressive to buy stories upon stories. 

Share with them the wonderful things of your student to the scholarship committee through your recommendation letter, rather than sharing touching stories about the student to gain empathy. 

The scholarship is an investment, just so you know. Give attributes about the students that will convince the committee that the student in question is worth investing in. 

In Connection to this, a well-written recommendation letter for a scholarship does not include stories about the struggles of the student. The writer should not by mistake include things that you might view are opportunities or weaknesses of the student.

To help your student achieve a scholarship, your recommendation letter should not only be in line with the scholarship requirements but also more about the student’s positive sides. 

As someone who has successfully written several recommendation letters for students who applied for one scholarship or the other, I can tell you how tactful the writing process can be because you may have to rewrite and reverse every draft. 

But I strongly believe that if you follow these tips I have shared in this post so far, you will be able to write a perfect recommendation letter for a scholarship without too much difficulty or making mistakes that will cost the student his/her scholarship. 

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